Wednesday, July 24, 2013

"That's the Kind of Mom I Want"

The other day we were watching television and Leilani turns around, looks at me and says: "That's the kind of mom I want. One that will play with me."

I was shocked and hurt! Already? I thought these types of comments would come during her teenage years not at 7! She waited for me to reply but as you can imagine I didn't have much to say... I was hurt.


At the moment Leilani turned around and said that to me the television displayed a parent and child playing dolls with one another. I admit I don't do that much... well... really ever but I didn't think it was such a big of an offense to desire another mom.

Now I'm trying to figure out how to play dolls with her so she wants me. A bit dramatic I know but I mean... seriously!

I've tried playing dolls with her but she has a strange way of playing.

She literally tells me how to play, what to make my doll say, when to say it, how to say it, and the list goes on and on. I don't know if I'm too old school or what but... that ain't fun! LOL. Oh, and the game always goes from 0-gajillion on the drama scale in no time.

While I'm busy being a monkey in the Rain Forest she swoops in and starts yelling about how terrible a monkey my monkey is because he drowned someone and then when I reply she tells me I replied wrong...
How is that fun?

I've talked to her about being less controlling of other people's imaginations- which kind of worked. However, I also think that I should just loosen up a bit and go along with her overtly dramatic and planned out game of dolls.

Really I have no idea what to do. 

Someone help! How do I play dolls with my child!? 

4 comments:

  1. I am so happy to find your blog as you address the very important issue of teen motherhood. I would love to talk with you about playing with your child, as play for children is so much different than we think of it as adults. It is used by the child to work through their hopes and fears, as well as to learn about, understand, name, and integrate their emotions. Through play, the witnessing adult/parent is given the chance to support,acknowledge, and see the person in front of them. I encourage you to continue playing with your daughter, letting her direct the play as she works through the confusing, sometimes scary, and also light-hearted parts of her world through the metaphor of play. Have fun! Erika May

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