Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Black and White: Parenting on the Colorline is looking for stories.

Posting this opportunity for anyone who may be interested. I have not worked with this group of women before so I can not personally give feedback.THIS IS NOT ONE OF MY PROJECTS. At this time there is no payment for stories. Editor told me they are working that out with the publishers. 

Call for Submissions
Black and White: Parenting on the Colorline (working title)an anthology edited by Caroline Berz, Jessie Scanlon and Kim DaCosta
When General Mills aired a Cheerios commercial featuring a family with a white mother, a black father and a biracial child, many viewers reacted positively, but the ad's YouTube page was filled with so much vitriol that the company disabled comments. A white woman calling in to the black comedian D.L. Hughley's radio show summed up the disgust: "Cereal is white. That has no place at the breakfast table. It's offensive." The Cheerios marketing team doubled down, spending $4 million to run a second ad with the family during the Super Bowl, yet many people are still uncomfortable with the very idea of a black/white family. As Washington Post columnist Richard Cohen put it, "people with conventional views must repress a gag reflex when considering the mayor-elect of New York - a white man married to a black woman with two biracial children." These are the stories of mixed race families that gain national attention. The anger, suspicion, and ignorance they reflect can also be felt in our most mundane daily interactions. Last year, a white man shopping at Walmart with his biracial children was suspected of kidnapping. Black fathers of lighter-skinned children often draw questioning stares, while darker-skinned mothers are often mistaken for "the nanny."

As a nation we are increasingly multiracial, but mixed race individuals and families are still perceived as an anomaly. For those of us living - and parenting -- on the colorline, events like the Cheerios controversy are urgent reminders that the society we are raising our children in is far from "post-racial," regardless of the election of the first African American/white president. Indeed, since Barack Obama moved into the White House, we've seen an increase in violence targeting those of African descent. In the last weeks and months, we have seen America at a tipping point as we have re-engaged in the pain and protest of a nation still wounded from its racist past--and present.

How do these issues affect the day-to-day lives of our families? How do they inform the many ways we parent our children, our hopes and dreams - and fears - for them? How do we go about the daily tasks of building and supporting our families, loving our partners, and growing into our own identities as parents when racism continues to be a defining issue in our schools, on our streets, in our government's policies and sometimes in our own homes?

The essays anthologized in Black and White: Parenting on the Colorline will explore the multiple and complex experiences of parenting children of African and European heritage, and of families formed by transracial adoption. The collection will pay close attention to the ways in which the mixed race identities of children and parents alike are informed by gender, class, sexuality, language and citizenship. The writing will be humorous and lyrical, insightful and critical, and most of all personal, reflecting the joys and challenges of mixed-race parenting.

Topics can include (but are not limited to): pregnancy and birth; adoption; LGBTQ families; interfaith and interracial families; divorce; single-parenting; grandparenting mixed children; racial implications of different parenting philosophies; specifics of parenting mixed girls and boys; gender-nonconforming children and families; special rights children and families; experiences at playgrounds and in mothers'/parents' groups; schools and education; notions of beauty; bullying; policing; questions of multiculturalism and diversity; individual and family identities that push the boundaries of the black/white binary.

Please send the editors a brief description of your proposed essay ASAP (250-300 words), a bio (200-250 words), and a list of previous publications. The essays can range in length and tone, though all should be accessible to a broad audience. Acceptance will depend upon the strength and fit of the completed essay.

As a nation we are increasingly multiracial, but mixed race individuals and families are still perceived as an anomaly. For those of us living - and parenting -- on the colorline, events like the Cheerios controversy are urgent reminders that the society we are raising our children in is far from "post-racial," regardless of the election of the first African American/white president. Indeed, since Barack Obama moved into the White House, we've seen an increase in violence targeting those of African descent. In the last weeks and months, we have seen America at a tipping point as we have re-engaged in the pain and protest of a nation still wounded from its racist past--and present.
How do these issues affect the day-to-day lives of our families? How do they inform the many ways we parent our children, our hopes and dreams - and fears - for them? How do we go about the daily tasks of building and supporting our families, loving our partners, and growing into our own identities as parents when racism continues to be a defining issue in our schools, on our streets, in our government's policies and sometimes in our own homes?
The essays anthologized in Black and White: Parenting on the Colorline will explore the multiple and complex experiences of parenting children of African and European heritage, and of families formed by transracial adoption. The collection will pay close attention to the ways in which the mixed race identities of children and parents alike are informed by gender, class, sexuality, language and citizenship. The writing will be humorous and lyrical, insightful and critical, and most of all personal, reflecting the joys and challenges of mixed-race parenting. 
Topics can include (but are not limited to): pregnancy and birth; adoption; LGBTQ families; interfaith and interracial families; divorce; single-parenting; grandparenting mixed children; racial implications of different parenting philosophies; specifics of parenting mixed girls and boys; gender-nonconforming children and families; special rights children and families; experiences at playgrounds and in mothers'/parents' groups; schools and education; notions of beauty; bullying; policing; questions of multiculturalism and diversity; individual and family identities that push the boundaries of the black/white binary.
Please send the editors a brief description of your proposed essay ASAP (250-300 words), a bio (200-250 words), and a list of previous publications. The essays can range in length and tone, though all should be accessible to a broad audience. Acceptance will depend upon the strength and fit of the completed essay.carolineberz@gmail.com

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