Sunday, May 31, 2015

#31DaysOfPositivity - day 31



Feel free to share the images and other positive messages for teen parents using #31DaysOfPositivity

read about the month long campaign here.
See past images here.

Saturday, May 30, 2015

Friday, May 29, 2015

Thursday, May 28, 2015

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Tuesday, May 26, 2015

Monday, May 25, 2015

Sunday, May 24, 2015

Saturday, May 23, 2015

Friday, May 22, 2015

Thursday, May 21, 2015

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Tuesday, May 19, 2015

Monday, May 18, 2015

Sunday, May 17, 2015

Saturday, May 16, 2015

Friday, May 15, 2015

Thursday, May 14, 2015

Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Monday, May 11, 2015

#31DaysOfPositivity day 11



Feel free to share the images and other positive messages for teen parents using #31DaysOfPositivity


read about the month long campaign here.
See past images here.

Teen Moms Need Support, Not Shame via NY Mag

One of my fellow #NoTeenShame mamas, Natasha Vianna, and myself were interviewed for NY Mag| The Cut about teen moms needing support not shame. 

I think it might be one of my favorite interviews... 


When Gloria Malone and Natasha Vianna got pregnant as teens, they thought their lives were over. This is, after all, what many teen pregnancy campaigns suggest. “You think being in school sucks? You know what sucks a lot more? A baby — every 2 hours for feeding time,” reads one ad from the Candie’s Foundation. Another says, “You’re supposed to be changing the world, not changing diapers.”
Over the past 20 years, the teen birth rate has declined almost continuously, but the U.S. has the highest teen pregnancy rates in the developed world. Statistically, teen parents in the U.S. are less likely to finish high school, more likely to experience poverty as adults, and more likely to have kids with poorer behavioral, educational, and health outcomes.  But many teens that become pregnant were already disadvantaged, and the stigma only makes things worse.
Giving birth at 15 and 17 respectively inspired Malone and Vianna to improve the experiences of other teen moms. They founded #noteenshamewith five other teen moms from across the country; and what started as a hashtag has become a larger effort to support teen moms, call out campaigns that traffic in stigma, and provide basic information and support to young parents. In addition to challenging shaming teen-pregnancy-prevention campaigns, founding members also consult with politicians around the country on improving outcomes for teen moms and how to create comprehensive sex ed. Vianna, now 27, gave a TedTalk in 2013, worked with Boston politicians to revise and implement a new policy for parenting students, and is the Digital Communications Manager at the Massachusetts Alliance on Teen Pregnancy. Malone, now 23, has written for the New York Timestaken on Bill O’Reilly, and created a website for teen moms in New York.

Over a three-way call one evening — “one of the perks of interviewing young parents is they’re home on a Friday night,” Malone quipped — they shared their experiences as pregnant and parenting teens, talked about the shame and stigma they’ve worked to overcome, and articulated what needs to change when it comes to teen pregnancy prevention.

Sunday, May 10, 2015

Saturday, May 9, 2015

Friday, May 8, 2015

Being a mom to a teen while being a former teen mom yourself | via Mutha Magazine

Sometimes I ask myself what is it like to be a mom of a teen? 
Heather Jackson provides some answers in her recent piece for Mutha Magazine. 

Thanks, Dude: HEATHER JACKSON, A (Formerly) Teen Mom On Raising A Teenager

I had my daughter when I was a teenager. Now my daughter is a teenager.
It’s fucking weird. Most of my friends still don’t have their first child yet. Here I am, with a kid, who is close to being a legal adult and moving out. She’s going to leave me and start her own life. I will still be in my 30s.
This has been some of the toughest shit I’ve ever done. When I was pregnant and gave birth, I honestly just kinda swung it. I let things happen as they did. I didn’t have a lot of support. I was a pregnant high-school student who was pregnant by another teenager who was about to go to jail for selling drugs. I was the epitome of society’s view of failure.

You can read the rest of her piece, Thanks, Dude: HEATHER JACKSON, A (Formerly) Teen Mom On Raising A Teenager, here

#31DaysOfPositivity- day 8



Feel free to share the images and other positive messages for teen parents using #31DaysOfPositivity



read about the month long campaign here.
See past images here.

Thursday, May 7, 2015

This Mother's Day listen to what teen moms want you to know.

photo via Young Motherhood UK photo series

What Teen Moms Want You to Know

We talk about teen pregnancy a lot but rarely take the time to listen

by Gloria Malone
When I became pregnant at 15, it was very clear from that moment on people were going to treat me differently. I got very little support and respect because most people believed the stereotype that all teenage mothers are failures and will never amount to much.
The huge focus on preventing teenage pregnancy has turned teen moms into cautionary tales and scapegoats when in reality we are women and mothers who need support and encouragement. We are often spoken about and condescended to, but we are rarely given the chance to speak for ourselves.
So I spoke with American and British women who had children in their teenage years, and here’s what they want you to know:
What is the biggest misconception about teenage parents?
"One of the most common misconceptions is that teen parents are irresponsible. We are very responsible. We often have jobs, we might be going to school, and we're taking care of our children all while dealing with daycare."
– Kenya Golden, 26, a Florida mom of a 7-year-old
"That we don't know how to care for the baby and that we are just babies ourselves."
– Krystal Cisneros, 22, a mom of four who lives in Orlando, Florida, and became a mother at 17
What do you wish society understood about teen parenting? 

What would you add? Let me know below in the comments, on Facebook, or on Twitter.